Media Kit

About Liquid Robotics

Liquid Robotics designs and manufactures the Wave Glider, the first wave and solar powered unmanned ocean robot. With our partners, we address many of the planet’s greatest challenges, by transforming how to assess, monitor, and protect the ocean. We solve critical problems for defense, commercial, and science customers.

Liquid Robotics and Wave Glider are registered trademarks of Liquid Robotics, Inc., a wholly owned subsidiary of The Boeing Company.

Learn more about Our History and meet our Leadership team.




Press Releases

Wave Gliders Collect Live Ocean Data from Hawaii’s Kilauea Volcano Lava Flow

June 25, 2018

Liquid Robotics announces the deployment of two Wave Gliders, autonomous ocean robots, to capture live ocean data close to where lava is flowing into the ocean from Hawaii’s Kilauea Volcano. By using this unmanned technology, scientists have the rare opportunity to study the effects of the lava entering the ocean, the plume it creates and […]

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Top Oceanographers Select Wave Gliders to Study Arctic and Southern Oceans

June 5, 2018

Top oceanographers from Scripps Institution of Oceanography (Scripps) and the Applied Physics Laboratory of the University of Washington (APL-UW) have selected Wave Gliders, the most experienced, long duration ocean robots, as their sensor platform to conduct advanced scientific research in the most inhospitable and remote regions of the Arctic and Southern Oceans. Using Liquid Robotics […]

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Japan Coast Guard Expands Wave Glider Fleet to Advance Ocean Observation

March 7, 2018

The Japan Coast Guard (JCG) announced the expansion of their unmanned ocean observation fleet of Wave Gliders to the 9th Regional District, headquartered in Niigata, Japan. This growth is part of JCG’s multi-year, ocean monitoring program to provide enhanced, real-time situational awareness of ocean currents, wave activity, and weather along Japan’s coastlines. Prior to this […]

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Published Research

Impacts of urban carbon dioxide emissions on sea-air flux and ocean acidification in nearshore waters

Devon Northcott, Jeff Sevadjian, Diego A. Sancho-Gallegos, Chris Wahl, Jules Friederich, and Francisco P. Chavez

Temporal variation in the structure and location of dynamic ocean features make them challenging to observe. Beyond requiring sufficient persistence and speed of the sensor platform, effective observation is augmented by autonomous feature detection coupled with adaptive localization of mapping effort. These capabilities enable observations to remain localized within […]

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Autonomous tracking of an oceanic thermal front by a Wave Glider

Yanwu Zhang, Carlos Rueda, Brian Kieft, John P. Ryan, Christopher Wahl, Thomas C. O’Reilly, Thom Maughan, and Francisco P. Chavez

Temporal variation in the structure and location of dynamic ocean features make them challenging to observe. Beyond requiring sufficient persistence and speed of the sensor platform, effective observation is augmented by autonomous feature detection coupled with adaptive localization of mapping effort. These capabilities enable observations to remain localized within […]

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Optimal path shape for range-only underwater target localization using a Wave Glider

Masmitja, Ivan, Spartacus Gomariz, Joaquin Del-Rio, Brian Kieft, Tom O’Reilly, Pierre-Jean Bouvet, and Jacopo Aguzzi

Underwater localization using acoustic signals is one of the main components in a navigation system for an autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) as a more accurate alternative to dead-reckoning techniques. Although different methods based on the idea of multiple beacons have been studied, other approaches use only one beacon, which […]

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